Research & Projects

Sandra K. Webster

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Professor and Chair of Psychology
Westminster College
New Wilmington, PA , USA 

Collaborations with members of the Class of 1999Seniors on break from their theses presentations in December 1998.

(I'm at 12:00 in the picture.  Moving clockwise around the photo:)
  • Keilon Ratliff  YOUNG ADULT CHILDREN'S PERCEPTION OF PARENT CONFLICT RESOLUTION STYLES AND PARENT-CHILD INTERACTION STYLES
  • Julie Bach THE EFFECT OF SEX-ROLE STEREOTYPES ON MEN'S AND WOMEN'S  SELF-DESCRIPTIONS
  • Marcella Carney YOUNG ADULT CHILDREN'S PERCEPTION OF PARENT CONFLICT RESOLUTION STYLES AND PARENT-CHILD INTERACTION STYLES
  • Autumn Pontius.  THE EFFECTS OF UNCONSCIOUS TRANSFERENCE ON THE ACCURACY OF EYEWITNESS IDENTIFICATION. (Autumn presented this research at the National Science Foundation and Council on Undergraduate Research co-sponsored poster session April Dialogue in Washington DC.)
  • Jenny Willison  THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROACTIVE COPING AND PERCEIVED STRESS
  • Laura Remaley (Dr. Sciutto's thesis advisee who wanted to be in my picture.)
  • Tatum Ruppert  GENDER DIFFERENCES IN NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS
  • Laura Grove.  COUPLES IN CONFLICT: AN EXAMINATION OF RELATIONSHIP, POWER, AND GENDER. (Laura received a Psi Chi Regional Research Award for her presentation of this research at the Eastern Psychological Association Meeting.)

  • Collaborations with members of the Class of  2000


    1998 Henderson Lecture

    Art by Dee Drisko.

    Coping and the Class of '98

    This research is a follow-up and combination of projects done in collaboration with Amy Herschell, Susan Gardner and Jennie Willison.  Outcome data were provided by Westminster College registrar Biz Hines and Dean of Students Neal Edman.  The Henderson Lecture is an annual award for a faculty member to complete a project and present it to the campus community.  It is named for it's sponsor Joseph  R. Henderson, Westminster Professor Emeritus, who was also the person who began a separate Psychology department at Westminster.

    Lecture Abstract:

        Within hours of entering college on September 1, 1994, virtually all the first-year students completed a psychological assessment that measured their styles of coping with stress. This lecture presented the relationships among coping styles then and academic outcome as of Graduation in May of 1998.
        Two major approaches to coping with stress were used in the 1994 assessment. The behavioral approach is defined by the way people act in stressful situations. The cognitive approach relies on the way people think about stressful situations. Each approach is characterized by a number of different styles (e.g., planful problem solving, escape-avoidance). The styles that were used by the class of '98 as they entered into college were profiled. The main portion of the lecture focused on the relationships of the coping styles to academic outcome. Although there are many different ways to define academic outcome, in this presentation it was defined by the number of terms completed at Westminster, the number of terms required for graduation, most recent cumulative grades, and disciplinary actions taken against a student. The lecture concluded with suggestions for effective coping drawn from the example of the class of '98.


    CyberPsychoCeramics

    Click here to visit my Virtual Museum exhibit of CyberPsychoCeramics.
    The exhibit on the left was part of Koop's Clay-Mates which showed at the Hoyt Institute of fine arts in March of 1999.  The 20 pots I chose to show all connect to psychology.  The Internet exhibit has a close-up of each pot with an explanation of the psychological meaning and a link to a relevant internet site.  You may visit the exhibit by clicking the picture.  We also put the rest of the show on the internet.  To visit it please click on the show announcement to the right.  

    Click here to view pictures of the entire show.


    Teaching with Technology


    Technology Integration:  Hitting a moving target.  Part of the symposium, Toward a well-integrated, research rich undergraduate psychology curriculum:  One department's journey, presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, August 1999, Boston.

    Cyberfluency in the 21st Century: Vive le Cyberspace.  Presentation  co-authored with Thomas P. Kelliher and Jill Zimmerman, at ASCUE '99 (Association of Small Computer Users in Education).

    Laptop Computer Use in Inquiry I and Web- Augmentation for courses.